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  • Writer's pictureDavid Carlson

November 11, 2023: Please join us for our Emmaus Community Celebration this Sunday

Please join us for our Emmaus Community Celebration this Sunday, November 12, 2023 at Knox Presbyterian or join us on ZOOM:


Sunday, November 12, 2023: Our celebration starts with greetings at 3:45pm (or earlier if the Spirit moves you)


In Person at Knox Presbyterian and Thanksgiving Lutheran (a facility we share with both congregations)

1650 West Third Street

Santa Rosa, CA 95401


On ZOOM

Join Zoom Meeting using this link:

Passcode: 1234


Or join the ZOOM Meeting by using the Meeting ID:

Start ZOOM, Select Join, and then Enter the Meeting ID at the prompt:

519 315 8573

Passcode: 1234


Whether you join in person or on ZOOM let your voice be heard.


Emmaus Liturgy November 12, 2023

A VIGIL FOR THE PEOPLE OF PALESTINE, ISRAEL, UKRAINE, AND RUSSIA


Ring the Singing Bell 3 times.



OPENING SONG: The Lord Hears the Cry of the Poor John Foley

David: https://youtu.be/DwFq1HrNiuU


DURING THE SONG, 8 CONGREGATES, ONE AT A TIME, GET A CANDLE AND PROCESS IT TO THE CENTRAL TABLE. THE CANDLES ARE UNLIT AT THIS POINT.


Steve: During this difficult time of war and desecration of human life, we may feel helpless. As David said at our last liturgy we need to pray. Sometimes it becomes too much for us to contemplate alone. That is why community is so important.


So let us hold vigil as community. We will sit in silence and if you are moved to speak, I ask you to stand up and pick up one candle and say your prayer aloud. Then carry the candle and place it on the altar and light it. After 7 candles are lit. I will place the eighth candle on the altar to represent all those prayers that have not yet been expressed. This will be a vigil specifically for those suffering in Palestine, Israel, Ukraine and Russia. We will have the opportunity to pray for other needs later in the liturgy.


Steve:

Pierre Teilhard de Chardin gives us a unique perspective on suffering, he says, “Human suffering, the sum total of suffering poured out at each moment over the whole earth, is like an immeasurable ocean. But what makes up this immensity? Is it blackness; emptiness, barren wastes? No, indeed: it is potential energy. The whole question is how to liberate it and give it a consciousness of its significance and potentialities.”



FIRST READING:

JoAnn:

More Love, More Love

Sorrow is how we learn to love.

—Rita Mae Brown, Riding Shotgun

If sorrow is how we learn to love,

then let us learn.

Already enough sorrow’s been sown for whole continents to erupt into astonishing tenderness.

Let us learn.

Let compassion grow rampant,

like sunflowers along the highway.

Let each act of kindness replant itself into acres and acres of widespread devotion.

Let us choose love as if our lives depend on it. The sorrow is great.

Let us learn to love greater

Riotous love, expansive love, love so rooted, so common

We almost forget the world could look any other way.

THE GOSPEL: THE PARABLE GOOD SAMARITAN Luke Chapter 10 vs 29-37

Jim McFadden:

But because he wished to justify himself, (the scholar of the law) said to Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?


Jesus replied, “A man fell victim to robbers as he went down from Jerusalem to Jericho. They stripped him and beat him and went off leaving him half-dead. A priest happened to be going down that road, but when he saw him, he passed by on the opposite side.


Likewise a Levite came to the place, and when he saw him, he passed by on the opposite side. But a Samaritan traveler who came upon him was moved with compassion at the sight. He approached the victim, poured oil and wine over his wounds and bandaged them. Then he lifted him up on his own animal, took him to an inn and cared for him.


The next day he took out two silver coins and gave them to the innkeeper with the instructions, ‘Take care of him. If you spend more than what I have given you, I shall repay you on my way back.’ Which of these three in your opinion, was neighbor to the robbers’ victim?” He answered, “The one who treated him with mercy.” Jesus said to him, “Go and do likewise.”


This is the Gospel according St. Luke

ALL: Alleluia


SHARED HOMILY:

Starter Questions:

1. During times like these where there is so much destruction and hate, how do you feel, how do you cope with these feelings?

2. How do you take action?, prayer, contacting elected officials and voicing your concerns, or go inside and take no action?

3. Is the Emmaus Community a refuge for you? Does praying in community help you in dealing with times like this?


Steve:

What do we bring to the table. What do you want to pray for?

John Poole: Offertory basket


David: OFFERTORY SONG: TURN TO ME St. Louis Jesuits



GATHERING UP OUR OFFERTORY GIFTS:

EUCHARISTIC PRAYER:

Steve:

O Holy Spirit, we find ourselves saddened and depressed by recent world events. What can we do? We know in our hearts that war is not the answer.


We question how human beings can treat one another in such horrendous fashion. How can people treat others as if they are not human? Are we not all children of God? We pray that we can find hope in you.


We ask that your grace open up avenues of communication so peace can be attained. Sometimes the human condition feels so helpless. May your spirit lead us to peaceful solutions and hope. We ask that all our prayers tonight be heard by you. Guide us in our words and actions.


Bless our gifts tonight and through this communal meal may we go forward with hope to make a difference in this troubled world.

ALL: Amen


BLESSING OF THE BREAD AND WINE:

Dan: On the night before He died, Jesus was at table with His friends, He took bread, He gave thanks to God, He blessed it, He broke it, and shared it with His friends and said,


ALL: “This is my body, shared with you.”


Steve: As supper was ending, Jesus took the cup of wine, He gave thanks, He gave it to His friends and said, This is the cup of my love for you and for all creation.


ALL: Go forth, be my hands and my feet; carry my love into the world so that it can be saved.


Steve: Let us proclaim the Mystery of Our Faith

For it is Through Christ, With Christ, and In Christ, in unity with the O Holy Spirit all honor and glory are yours, now and forever and ever.


ALL: Amen


Dan: Now together, as one community, we offer to you O Creator, our prayer, received from our brother Jesus:


ALL:

Our Mother, Our Father, holy and blessed is your true name.

We pray for your reign of peace to come. We pray that your good will be done.

Let heaven and earth become one. Give us this day the bread we need.

Give it to those who have none.

Let forgiveness flow like a river between us, from each one to each one. Lead us to holy innocence beyond the evil of our days.

Come swiftly Mother, Father, come.

For yours is the power and the glory and the mercy: Forever your name is All in One.


ALL: Amen

Steve: The Kiss of Peace:

Now offer a gesture of peace to those in our beloved Emmaus community.


INVITATION TO THE EUCHARIST:


Dan: Through this Eucharist, and in the spirit of our Beloved Community, we extend the invitation of Jesus to each and everyone of you to take and eat this bread, and drink from this cup. Let us come to this table, this is the table of the Risen Christ, where all are welcome.


COMMUNION:

David: COMMUNION SONG:

I KNOW YOU ARE THERE St. Louis Jesuits https://youtu.be/kVl4nrfSQ-w


Post-Communion Prayer: Dan:

O God, you are morning and mercy to all our darkness and to all our sorrow, come to us now and make our hearts readyto encounter You this day. Accept our silences as well as our words, our intentions as well as our actions, our doubts aswell as our faith. Mend us where we are afraid; and send us out into the world to mend, enliven, and encourage, in thename of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. Amen.


POST COMMUNION QUIET REFLECTION (A MOMENT OF SILENCE)



CLOSING BLESSING: Prayers For The Life Of The World

- John Philip Newell

ALL:

In lives where love has been born this day, thanks be to you, O God.

In families where forgiveness has been strong, thanks be to you.

In nations where wrongs have been addressed, where tenderness has been cherished, and where visions for earth’s oneness have been served, thanks be to you.

May those who are weary find rest this night.

May those who carry great burdens for their people find strength.

May the midwives of new beginnings in our world find hope.

And may the least among us find greatness, strength in our souls, worth in our words, love in our living.

And the people of this Beloved Emmaus Community say: AMEN



ANNOUNCEMENTS:

We celebrate November Birthdays:

Update on Community Meeting / Board elections in January

Sam Jones cooking

Plans for Thanksgiving at Emmaus

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