• David Carlson

724 The deeper I descend into myself, the more I find God at the heart of my being

Day 724 Thursday, March 10, 2022

“The deeper I descend into myself, the more I find God at the heart of my being.”


The Sufi poet Rumi [1207–1273] describes our soul-space as a magnificent cathedral where we are “sweet beyond telling.”


Saint Teresa of Ávila [1515–1582] views it as a castle. . . .


Another way to speak about this inner sphere where our truest self and God dwell is with the words of scripture. In his letter to the Corinthians, Paul asks, “Do you not know that you are God’s temple and that God’s Spirit dwells in you?” (1 Corinthians 3:16).


The body is often referred to as a temple of God but our soul is also a wondrous residence.


This hidden part of us, in union with divinity, is where our abundant goodness (our God-ness) exists. Jesuit paleontologist, Teilhard de Chardin [1881–1955], understood the necessity of opening the door inward to find and claim this goodness. Reflecting on his spiritual growth, Chardin observed this truth: “The deeper I descend into myself, the more I find God at the heart of my being.”



Cathedrals. Castles. Temples. However we describe our inner terrain, one thing is certain: we tend to live in just a few rooms of our inner landscape. The full person God created us to be, contains more than we can imagine, but most of us dwell within only a small portion of the superb castle of ourselves. Opening the door of our heart allows us entrance to the vast treasure of who we are and to the divine presence within us.


Author Paula D’Arcy suggests fire as another metaphor to describe the mystery at the center of our being:


Mystics and sages of all traditions speak of the inner fire, the divine spark hidden in our very cells and in all that lives. This flame of love is the pure presence of God. Because of it, life is sustained. No power is greater.


Rupp continues: "Our authentic self, which is in union with God, may seem out of reach. It never is. “Deep in ourselves is the true Self,” writes Beatrice Bruteau [1930–2014], “and that true Self is not separate from, or even different from, the Source of Being.” Always our truest self cries out to be known, loved, embraced, welcomed without judgment and integrated into the way we live.


When we open the door and go inside, God is there in the temple of our soul, in the ashram of our heart, in the cathedral of our being. Which is not to dismiss the reality of this same loving presence being fully alive in our external world.


The Holy One is with us in all of life.


Our purpose for opening the door inward is to help us know and claim who we are so we can more completely join with God in expressing this love in every part of our external world.


Reflection by Richard Rohr

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